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Positive, powerful co-creative wave

As the collective cWave surfingonsciousness shifts further towards a co-creative existence we have a powerful opportunity to accelerate our own growth and expansion. The coming wave of energy has the capacity to lift all of us to a greater level of co-creative power than ever before – as long as we’re ready and aligned to it. We’ve been expecting this wave for some time and, as it comes closer, a little more detail would be useful as each stage of the wave tends to require a different alignment – just ask any surfer. I’ve added some links to some videos that’ll help you align to each phase.

Phase 1: As the wave is building the water level seems to drop and the motion of the water goes backwards. This is similar to the extremely low tide that occurs before any tsunami. At this point you need to point your surfboard towards the shore and paddle like crazy to build momentum for what’s coming. This is the phase we’re in now. It may feel like things are going backwards but it’s just the polarity building towards what comes next. Now is the time to increase the amount of energy you’re putting into the projects that’ll take you to your next level of expansion.  This phase will probably last until about August of this year. Click here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2uQFfpe6C18 to watch David Tennant (former Dr Who) sum up this current period for you.

Phase 2: The water stops dropping and the flow begins to reverse. This is the time to get up on your board and make sure you’re probably balanced. That means you want to ensure that any systems you’ve put into place for your future projects are having the effects – both direct and indirect – that you want them to. This period will probably cover the latter part of 2017 until the later part of 2018. Click here http://www.ted.com/talks/jeanne_gang_buildings_that_blend_nature_and_city to learn about how everything in our lives, including the buildings we live in, can be a system for interdependency and co-creation.

Phase 3: This is the fun phase that most of us focus on, but it’s important to remember we can’t get there without the momentum of phase 1 and the alignment of phase 2. In this phase the wave is moving through powerfully. It’s not only lifted our surfboard, it’s got enough strength and vigour that we can do all that cool stuff – shooting tubes or whatever it is that surfers do. This is the phase in which all your creative endeavours will manifest with ease, grace and joy. It’s an incredible time – and one we’re all looking forwards to. The main challenge here is to increase our capacity for the positive, for joy and pleasure. This period will probably start either late 2018 or early 2019 and continue for at least four or five years. This is the time we’ve all been working towards, to make sure we’re positioned to make the most of it. Click here https://www.ted.com/talks/mihaly_csikszentmihalyi_on_flow to learn how to flow with happiness.

Phase 4: This is the last phase that comes with mastery of all the previous phases. Things are now easy and we’re able to simply go with what we’ve created. It’s important in this phase to really enjoy all the fruits of our co-creations as the new cycle will be coming soon. We will move into this phase in the mid 2020s. Things are going to be good for a long while. Yay! Click here https://www.ted.com/talks/don_norman_on_design_and_emotion to learn some design techniques not only for your work and creations, but your life itself.

If you align yourself to the wave that’s coming, with special attention to each phase, your life will expand over the next few years to a level you won’t have conceived of before now. It’s going to be exciting!  We wish you joy of the journey.

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Cooperation looking like true evolution

It’s fascinating to watch the way the collective consciousness is manifesting things to support its development of interdependent archetypes and a new, interdependent perspective on life.

Homo-SapiensOne of the ways that is emerging is the discovery of new human species in our ancient family tree.  This is causing many scientists to review their understanding of how humanity has evolved.

Up until now the theory of our evolution, not surprisingly, has been modelled along codependent lines.  Essentially the evolutionary ‘winner’ was considered to be the most competitive; this is a view which gives value to the more aggressive.

This is how, for example, the Neanderthals were believed to have become extinct.  When modern man arrived in Europe it was around the time that the Neanderthals disappeared.  New findings, however, show that the Neanderthal was probably more effected by a volcanic winter and actually still exist today.  About 30% of the Neanderthal genes are still in the modern population, spread across different individuals.  For example, if you have straight hair it probably comes from them.

This finding has encouraged scientists to begin to see our evolution as a more cooperative (read interdependent) process than a competitive one.  Modern humans didn’t kill off the Neanderthals but co-existed and even interbred with them.

This view has been further reinforced by the increasing number of finds of more species of human.

There was much more interaction and cooperation in our past than we have been taught.  The story is changing.  This is another step towards building a more interdependent story for ourselves.

 

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Regreening the simple (but effective) way.

I’ve always said the technology to regreen the earth and solve climate change already exists, but the will does not.  Happily this program called FMNR (Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration) proves that I was right about the former, but wrong about the latter.

The simplicity of the answer is very cool – and effective.  Rather than planting new trees, which takes many years for benefits to be realised, they’ve begun to simply protect and appropriately prune the regrowth from trees which still have viable roots under the soil.  Overgrazing wasn’t allowing these trees to regrow but, with the right approach, benefits are being realised within years, rather than decades.

The FMNR program has already re-greened millions of hectares in Africa, with manifold benefits in the health, nutrition and even education of the locals, as well as benefits to our planet as a whole and to the climate.  There’s always an answer, if only we can see it.  And, thanks to this one Australian aid worker, one of the answers to healing a devastated environment has been found.

So if you’re feeling a little hopeless about climate change, watch this and you’ll rekindle hope for yourself.  If you’d like to assist in rekindling hope for this planet you can always go to www.fmnrhub.com.au 

 

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Want something inspiring?

One thing the fractal teaches us is that everything serves – everything has its place in the whole.  If even one piece is missing we are diminished.  This short video shows that in clear ways.  When the wolves were re-introduced into Yellowstone Park after an absence of 70 years no one was sure what was going to happen – they certainly didn’t expect it to change the course of the river!!

 

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Imaginary friends prove the wisdom of play

For many years we have all been told that having imaginary friends is a sign of a disturbed mind, that it is some kind of delusion to compensate for deep issues. As someone with invisible (not imaginary) friends, I’ve always found this attitude a strange one as I’ve been keenly aware of the profound benefits of their company in my own life.

Now Evan Kidd, senior lecturer in psychology at ANU, has started the work for us to understand these relationships in a different way.  It’s clear he believes invisible friends are imaginary, but he has done some well-designed research to determine what, if anything, is the effect of having imaginary friends.  And he has found that having such friends has enormous benefits.

The video here is of Evan Kidd, talking at TedX at Sydney. I’ll let him tell you himself about the benefits. Primarily he’s found that having imaginary (or, I suppose, invisible) friends helps us greatly with developing our ability to talk to people in different realities, which is what we’re doing when we’re children and talking to adults.

As he sees this very much in terms of his study of the importance of play he’s been able to apply these understandings to how important it is for all of us to learn through play. It’s through play we develop such higher skills, and so begin the development of our own wisdom.

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Pacific Interdependency

pacific islandsOne of the signs of the evolution of the collective consciousness is to be found in the continuing shift from codependent financial rescue to interdependent financial co-creation.  This has sometimes been summed up as ‘trade, not aid’.

A recent, and very encouraging, example of this is to be found right here in Australia.  The Australian government is reducing their foreign aid but at the same time the Pacific Seasonal Worker Program has been established.  This program was established about five years ago to alleviate the chronic shortage of reliable seasonal labour in Australia.  Many farmers require this kind of labour for crops that have to be harvested by hand, like asparagus.   The problem is that backpackers can be very unreliable and tend to move on after only a short time.

By offering this kind of seasonal work to the Vanuatuans, or Ni-Vans as they call themselves, the farmers get a reliable source of labour, many of whom return year after year so they are also skilled at the work.  The farmers also are relieved of any concerns about the possible legality of the workforce and are able to plan their crops ahead, knowing the harvesters will be there.  The workers get to be paid a good wage with a strong currency.  This is important as in Vanuatu even primary school has to be paid for so being able to get this kind of work enables those who do the labour to pay for their children’s education, and hence this program is also acting to break the poverty cycle.

The scheme now extends to eight countries of the near Pacific, including Timor-Leste.  It is a program which is working for all those concerned; the farmers, the workers and those who manage the scheme.  This kind of co-creative practice solves problems for everyone, enabling them all to expand their abundance and fulfilment in life.  It is these kind of programs which are truly interdependent; they offer true long-term solutions instead of simple band-aids.

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The Obvious Breakthrough

new-breakthroughMany of the breakthroughs we get with modern technology take thinking in a new reality, like the lightbulb.  But many are the results of common sense, but obvious only after the fact. Like wheels on luggage.  And don’t we all wish we’d invented that?

Such a breakthrough has just happened in the land of practical solutions, New Zealand.

A new way to catch fish alive and unharmed was secretly developed in Nelson and unveiled only yesterday.  It will revolutionise the fishing industry (given time) to the benefit of the marine biodiversity and fishing stocks around the world.

Precision Seafood Harvesting (PSH) was suggested by Nelson Plant and Food Research science group leader Alistair Jerrett to a sceptical fishing industry several years ago. So often the obvious meets with resistance just because it hasn’t been done before. But now it’s a fact with an investment of $52 million by three of New Zealand’s biggest seafood companies and the Government.

The system has been successfully trialled in commercial volumes, and has resulted in catches as large as they were with the older nets.  It allows small fish to escape unharmed from a new tunnel-like net end made of PVC. Bigger fish are brought on board trawlers alive and in top condition. They can then be sorted, with bycatch species (fish we don’t eat) released.

It can also bring fish up alive from 200 metres. Catches from deeper water, unable to survive the ascent, can be landed in much better condition than the present method, which squeezes them into a compact mass and which also strains them out of the water.

This “cod end” now has a worldwide patent.  After 150 years of little change in the nets of the fishing industry this opens up new ways to protect fish stocks while ensuring a premium-quality catch.  It’s a win for both industry and the environment, as well as the common sense thinking that brought it to us.