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2017: The Year of New Realities

SpaceIn 2017 we’re going to be holding another Wesak retreat.  This is to mark the upturn in the energy trend we’ve been experiencing over the last few years.

We spoke about that trend in the post A while longer . . .

If you haven’t read that post yet, it would be good to do it now.

In 2017 we’ll be moving into new realities.  At that time the co-creative, interdependent energies will begin to grow stronger.  With this energy we will be able to finally truly begin to manifest into the physical the new realities we have all been working towards for so long.

We will be holding the Wesak retreat in Ankhor Wat, as we spoke about in an earlier post.  The retreat will be from Thursday 25th to Sunday 28th May.  We are looking to finalise details over the next few months.

If you want to look into travel plans for yourself, the closest place to the temples is Siem Reap.  Unfortunately this is not the best time of the year to visit this place as it is the beginning of the rainy season.  However, this is the time when the energy is on the turn so this is when we are going.

The rainy season can be a dramatic time, but the weather can be hot so we will be looking to stay at a place with air conditioning and a generator as there are, apparently, often black outs at this time of the year with everyone using the air conditioning.  On the plus side, there will hopefully be fewer other visitors this time of the year.

 

 

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The Power of Resonance

We speak a lot about resonance and its power.  Sometimes we may think or feel this is an esoteric concept without any real power in the physical world.  But it has great power.  This is a video of a bridge that was brought down shortly after being completed due to the resonance created by the wind of the chasm creating vibration within its structure.  As you watch this video, remember – this is all the result of resonance.

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A Fractologist’s view

I’ve been asked many times what it is we Fractologists see.  It’s a tricky question of course, because every Fractologist perceives energy and its underlying fractal structure differently.  Some of us see it, though in different ways, some of us feel it and some of us hear it like a repeating phrase of music.

But no matter how we perceive it we all perceive the same integrity pattern that underlies and creates the essence of all things.

This short video is a fractal zoom video.  It’ll take you deep into the most famous fractal of them all, the Mandelbrot set.  Notice how much infinite detail there is in the fractal, and how the initial pattern keeps turning up, no matter how deeply we go.  These are essential fractal traits.

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World Science Festival

holographic_world-757x467I’ve recently been listening to some of the recordings of the World Science Festival.  This is a very cool gathering that happens in New York where eminent scientists get together to let the world know what is happening at the frontiers of science.  There are many excellent talks to choose from.

What I particularly found fascinating was how many of the panels included physicists and philosophers.  That in itself is a powerful sign of how close our understanding of the world around us and our consciousness is becoming.

In the talk I’ve included here, which you can also find at the World Science Festival website at http://www.worldsciencefestival.com/programs/holographic_world/ , they’re not only talking about the world we know it as a hologram but it seems they are getting very close to understanding that fractals are essential to a unified understanding.

Note where Professor Raphael Bousso talks about how their growing understanding of black holes has led them to realise that the key is to unify quantum mechanics, which is about information, and gravity, which is about the shape of space and time.  Fractals hold complex information in simple codes, and our understanding of them was derived from topology, the study of shapes and surfaces.  So far they are still studying the information side of things from a linear perspective, which is, I believe, holding up the next significant breakthrough.  But when a network theory of information is developed they’ll understand better that the information on the surface of a black hole is not so much individual bits of information but networked bits, and then we’ll see another revolution in technology.

Or so I believe.  It’s going to be interesting to see what happens.

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Holographic Initiations in Brazil

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Holographic initiates with Dr Catherine Wilkins

Today we marked a milestone in Fractology. We had a group initiation into the hologram, and fractal perception which is enabled by holographic space. This initiation is done part-way through the Fractology Practitioner training and marks a milestone in our spiritual and metaphysical awareness.

This group initiation is a shift globally for Fractology, and for me personally as I haven’t initiated more than one person at a time into this space before now.

Fractology is growing up and going global.

Congratulations to all the initiates. The future for Sao Paulo is looking brighter by the minute.

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Kepler 452b

Kepler 452bIt wasn’t so long ago we thought our solar system housed the only planets in the galaxy.  From a consciousness perspective, the arguments about whether or not other planets existed were powerfully connected to the belief in the specialness of human life and that the whole of creation is about human life on planet earth.

So it wasn’t surprising that when they did finally find exoplanets (planets other than those in our solar system) that many people’s first response was, ‘yes, but they can’t support life’.  Which was true, but only because at that time the technology we had could only detect planets by noticing the effect of the gravity of the planet upon its star.  This meant the only planets we could see at that time were the extremely large ones, something like our Jupiter.

Now NASA has found a planet, Kepler 452b, in the ‘Goldilocks’ zone; not too cold, and not too hot.  It is also a rocky planet, meaning it has a solid mantle, like ours.  So there is the chance it can support life not too dissimilar from ours.  There is, of course, an argument underway as to whether or not this is possible.  The planet is 1400 light years away so we’re not going to be visiting it anytime soon and answering these questions is still tricky.

I’m sure, in time, we will find other life-supporting planets, if not this one then another one.  Which wll be one more tangible step in the awareness of the collective consciousness that life is more than we know and existence isn’t confined to our planet.

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The Obvious Breakthrough

new-breakthroughMany of the breakthroughs we get with modern technology take thinking in a new reality, like the lightbulb.  But many are the results of common sense, but obvious only after the fact. Like wheels on luggage.  And don’t we all wish we’d invented that?

Such a breakthrough has just happened in the land of practical solutions, New Zealand.

A new way to catch fish alive and unharmed was secretly developed in Nelson and unveiled only yesterday.  It will revolutionise the fishing industry (given time) to the benefit of the marine biodiversity and fishing stocks around the world.

Precision Seafood Harvesting (PSH) was suggested by Nelson Plant and Food Research science group leader Alistair Jerrett to a sceptical fishing industry several years ago. So often the obvious meets with resistance just because it hasn’t been done before. But now it’s a fact with an investment of $52 million by three of New Zealand’s biggest seafood companies and the Government.

The system has been successfully trialled in commercial volumes, and has resulted in catches as large as they were with the older nets.  It allows small fish to escape unharmed from a new tunnel-like net end made of PVC. Bigger fish are brought on board trawlers alive and in top condition. They can then be sorted, with bycatch species (fish we don’t eat) released.

It can also bring fish up alive from 200 metres. Catches from deeper water, unable to survive the ascent, can be landed in much better condition than the present method, which squeezes them into a compact mass and which also strains them out of the water.

This “cod end” now has a worldwide patent.  After 150 years of little change in the nets of the fishing industry this opens up new ways to protect fish stocks while ensuring a premium-quality catch.  It’s a win for both industry and the environment, as well as the common sense thinking that brought it to us.